Regimental Structure


During the mid eighteenth century a regiment of foot consisted of 10 companies. At full strength a typical company consisted of a Captain, Lieutenant, Ensign, 3 Sergeants, 3 Corporals, 2 Drummers and 70 Private Men. Officially 6 wives and their children were also allowed per company. Nine companies consisted of hatmen and one of grenadiers, the toughest and most experienced men in the regiment.
 

Officers

NCO's

Drummers

 Officers
 

 NCO's      
 

 Drummers     
 

The Men

The Wives

The Surgeon

 The Men

 The Wives

 The Surgeon

Of the ten companies, three would be commanded by field officers instead of Captains, the Colonel, Lieutenant-Colonel and Major. Colonels rarely fought with their regiments delegating command to the Lieutenant-Colonel or Major.

In addition to the field officers there were also a number of staff officers such as surgeon and chaplain. The posts of adjutant, quartermaster and paymaster were usually, though not invariably, held by officers in addition to their regular commissions.

An Act for punishing Mutiny and Desertion ; and for the better Payment of the Army and their Quarters. (1741)



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